Love Bucket News: Break-Up Season Begins

Monday, February 20th, 2012 Posted in Dating, Mating, Relating | 1 Comment »

Valentine’s is the start of Break-Up Season.

Never heard of it?

It’s a very real phenomenon.

It’s the 2-3 weeks, immediately following Valentine’s where the peak of relationship statuses across the 800 Million users of Facebook changes to "single".

It is the highest peak 3-week period of break-ups in the entire year.

And it starts with Valentine’s Day.

You see, you (probably), most of your friends (almost certainly) and just about everyone THINKS that Valentine’s is a "love" holiday.

Here’s a pretty picture (one of MANY based on this statistic):

breakups facebook Love Bucket News: Break Up Season Begins

 

It’s February Statistics time:

The legal world has another fun-statistic for us.

February is the single most popular month for divorce.

Perhaps this is because seeing other couples express their Valentines affection serves as a wake up call that our hearts are no longer in it – and the love bucket is empty.  The majority of divorces are initiated by women.

February Divorce Rate Valentines Sm1 Love Bucket News: Break Up Season Begins

Valentine’s is smack in the middle of the highest divorce filling month of the year and kick-starts the highest peak of all break-ups in the year.

Some Free Tips…

If you missed the Free Romantic Tips giveaway, you still have time to get them and fill the love bucket before it is too late.  Click here for your Free Romantic Tips

Some Free Tips for Breakups…

Do you want to be part of the February Break-ups, the Most Active Month for Divorce?  Even if you’re not married, 80% of break-ups are the result of a one-sided decision.

 

break up time Love Bucket News: Break Up Season Begins

Now, it doesn’t have to end in divorce.

stop thumb Love Bucket News: Break Up Season Begins
“How to Get Your Ex Back… Or…
How to STOP Your Break-up
Before
It’s Set In Stone”

Discover the 4 Steps Now:

How To Get Your Ex Back By Filling Her Love Bucket

- or -

Simply Use Mike’s Text My Wife Into Bed Right Away or Use a Textramessage (Extra Text Messages)  to Text My Ex Back for men and women (different psychology for men and women’s texts)cold heart Love Bucket News: Break Up Season Begins

Last, if you want to read WHY WE BROKE UP and the reasons “we broke up because” check this book and all the break up stories.

Fill The Love Bucket: Married or not… you should read this.

Sunday, February 12th, 2012 Posted in Dating, Mating, Relating, The Love Bucket® | 2 Comments »

 

Marriage.

Married or not… you should read this.

woman curled bed thumb Fill The Love Bucket: Married or not… you should read this.

“When I got home that night as my wife served dinner, I held her hand and said, I’ve got something to tell you. She sat down and ate quietly. Again I observed the hurt in her eyes.

Suddenly I didn’t know how to open my mouth. But I had to let her know what I was thinking. I want a divorce. I raised the topic calmly. She didn’t seem to be annoyed by my words, instead she asked me softly, why?

I avoided her question. This made her angry. She threw away the chopsticks and shouted at me, you are not a man! That night, we didn’t talk to each other. She was weeping. I knew she wanted to find out what had happened to our marriage. But I could hardly give her a satisfactory answer; she had lost my heart to Jane. I didn’t love her anymore. I just pitied her!

With a deep sense of guilt, I drafted a divorce agreement which stated that she could own our house, our car, and 30% stake of my company. She glanced at it and then tore it into pieces. The woman who had spent ten years of her life with me had become a stranger. I felt sorry for her wasted time, resources and energy but I could not take back what I had said for I loved Jane so dearly. Finally she cried loudly in front of me, which was what I had expected to see. To me her cry was actually a kind of release. The idea of divorce which had obsessed me for several weeks seemed to be firmer and clearer now.

The next day, I came back home very late and found her writing something at the table. I didn’t have supper but went straight to sleep and fell asleep very fast because I was tired after an eventful day with Jane. When I woke up, she was still there at the table writing. I just did not care so I turned over and was asleep again.

In the morning she presented her divorce conditions: she didn’t want anything from me, but needed a month’s notice before the divorce. She requested that in that one month we both struggle to live as normal a life as possible. Her reasons were simple: our son had his exams in a month’s time and she didn’t want to disrupt him with our broken marriage.

This was agreeable to me. But she had something more, she asked me to recall how I had carried her into out bridal room on our wedding day. She requested that every day for the month’s duration I carry her out of our bedroom to the front door ever morning. I thought she was going crazy. Just to make our last days together bearable I accepted her odd request.

I told Jane about my wife’s divorce conditions.  She laughed loudly and thought it was absurd. No matter what tricks she applies, she has to face the divorce, she said scornfully.

My wife and I hadn’t had any body contact since my divorce intention was explicitly expressed. So when I carried her out on the first day, we both appeared clumsy. Our son clapped behind us, daddy is holding mommy in his arms. His words brought me a sense of pain. From the bedroom to the sitting room, then to the door, I walked over ten meters with her in my arms. She closed her eyes and said softly; don’t tell our son about the divorce. I nodded, feeling somewhat upset. I put her down outside the door. She went to wait for the bus to work. I drove alone to the office.

On the second day, both of us acted much more easily. She leaned on my chest. I could smell the fragrance of her blouse. I realized that I hadn’t looked at this woman carefully for a long time. I realized she was not young any more. There were fine wrinkles on her face, her hair was graying! Our marriage had taken its toll on her. For a minute I wondered what I had done to her.

On the fourth day, when I lifted her up, I felt a sense of intimacy returning. This was the woman who had given ten years of her life to me. On the fifth and sixth day, I realized that our sense of intimacy was growing again. I didn’t tell Jane about this. It became easier to carry her as the month slipped by. Perhaps the everyday workout made me stronger.

She was choosing what to wear one morning. She tried on quite a few dresses but could not find a suitable one. Then she sighed, all my dresses have grown bigger. I suddenly realized that she had grown so thin, that was the reason why I could carry her more easily.

Suddenly it hit me… she had buried so much pain and bitterness in her heart. Subconsciously I reached out and touched her head.

Our son came in at the moment and said, Dad, it’s time to carry mom out. To him, seeing his father carrying his mother out had become an essential part of his life. My wife gestured to our son to come closer and hugged him tightly. I turned my face away because I was afraid I might change my mind at this last minute. I then held her in my arms, walking from the bedroom, through the sitting room, to the hallway. Her hand surrounded my neck softly and naturally. I held her body tightly; it was just like our wedding day.

But her much lighter weight made me sad. On the last day, when I held her in my arms I could hardly move a step. Our son had gone to school. I held her tightly and said, I hadn’t noticed that our life lacked intimacy. I drove to office…. jumped out of the car swiftly without locking the door. I was afraid any delay would make me change my mind…I walked upstairs. Jane opened the door and I said to her, Sorry, Jane, I do not want the divorce anymore.

She looked at me, astonished, and then touched my forehead. Do you have a fever? She said. I moved her hand off my head. Sorry, Jane, I said, I won’t divorce. My marriage life was boring probably because she and I didn’t value the details of our lives, not because we didn’t love each other anymore.

Now I realize that since I carried her into my home on our wedding day I am supposed to hold her until death do us apart. Jane seemed to suddenly wake up. She gave me a loud slap and then slammed the door and burst into tears. I walked downstairs and drove away. At the floral shop on the way, I ordered a bouquet of flowers for my wife. The salesgirl asked me what to write on the card. I smiled and wrote, I’ll carry you out every morning until death do us apart.

That evening I arrived home, flowers in my hands, a smile on my face, I run up stairs, only to find my wife in the bed – dead. My wife had been fighting CANCER for months and I was so busy with Jane to even notice. She knew that she would die soon and she wanted to save me from the whatever negative reaction from our son, in case we push through with the divorce.— At least, in the eyes of our son—- I’m a loving husband….

The small details of your lives are what really matter in a relationship. It is not the mansion, the car, property, the money in the bank. These create an environment conducive for happiness but cannot give happiness in themselves.
So find time to be your spouse’s friend and do those little things for each other that build intimacy. Do have a real happy marriage!

If you share this, you just might save a marriage. Many of life’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.

shared by Razel Miguel

razel shares thumb Fill The Love Bucket: Married or not… you should read this.

 Fill The Love Bucket: Married or not… you should read this.

Can Celebrity and Money Fill The Love Bucket?

Friday, August 26th, 2011 Posted in Dating, Mating, Relating, Her Love Bucket, Lovematism, The Love Bucket® | No Comments »

Fame and Money – Can They Fill The Love Bucket?

All the fame and money in the world does not make a relationship or marriage easy. Your love bucket my not be filled. Your Love Dynamics may be misaligned at times.

If you love the music of ColdPlay you may know that Chris Martin is married to Gwyneth Paltrow.

Here is a frank and honest interview where Gwyneth Paltrow that is transparent about marriage. Even with all the money and celebrity, lovematism is not guaranteed 24/7. Read on:

Gwyneth Paltrow admits marriage to Coldplay’s Chris Martin ‘is hard’

Gwyneth Paltrow, the Hollywood actress, has admitted that her marriage to Chris Martin, the Coldplay lead singer, is not always “rosy”.

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Chris Martin and Gwyneth Paltrow in 2003. The couple are rarely photographed in public together. Photo: REX FEATURES

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Gwyneth Paltrow appears in a jewellery supplement in the August 2011 edition of Vanity Fair Photo: Mark Seliger /VANITY FAIR

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Gwyneth Paltrow in her first and uncontroversial performance on Glee

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Gwyneth Paltrow,Tim McGraw dancing in the swirl of the classroom in Country Strong

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Gwyneth Paltrow, left, and Vince Gill perform at the 44th Annual Country Music Awards in Nashville Photo: AP

05 Aug 2011

In a candid magazine interview, the 38-year-old Oscar winning actress confessed that she finds her seven-and-half-year marriage her husband “hard”.

But the actress and aspiring musician, who won the Best Actress Oscar for her role in the Hollywood film Shakespeare In Love, added that she was not going to take her marriage “for granted”.

She added her husband, 34, was a great father to their children. The couple have two children, Apple, seven, and Moses, five and split their time between homes New York and North London.

Married since December 2003, the couple have become known for attempting to never be photographed together in public and rarely talk about their relationship.

But the pair have been forced to strenuously deny repeated claims in the tabloid press that their marriage is in trouble.

Miss Paltrow, who has starred in Ironman and Glee, the cult TV show, denied the couple had any intention of separating.

But asked to respond to the false rumours about a separation, she told the American edition of Elle Magazine: “Sometimes it’s hard being with someone for a long time.

“We go through periods that aren’t all rosy. I always say, life is long and you never know what’s going to happen.

“If, God forbid, we were ever not to be together, I respect him so much as the father of my children. Like, I made such a good choice.”

She added: “He’s such a good dad. You can never be relaxed or smug and think, I’ve got this thing.

“That’s also part of it – keeping yourself on your toes. I’m not going to take this for granted.”

Asked why she kept her marriage out of the public eye, she replied: “He makes music for his fans, and he doesn’t want people to conjure a lame famous couple when they’re getting into his music. I get it.”

Miss Paltrow described her husband as a “musical genius”, as Coldplay is one of the world’s most successful bands.

“It’s like living with Picasso,” she added.

She has also launched a lifestyle website, GOOP, in which she says gives fans tips and tricks about healthy eating and exercise routines.

"When you go to Paris and your concierge sends you to some… restaurant because they get a kickback, it’s like, ‘No. Where should I really be?’" she said.

"Where is the great bar with organic wine? Where do I get a bikini wax in Paris? People know that I know that."

She also views her online newsletter as a way to motivate those who can benefit from her health regimens. She intends to continue writing her website because she loves "inspiring people”.

"It’s so much easier to sit home and criticise other people," she added.

“What I love is inspiring people. People come up to me and say, ‘I want to have two kids and wear a bathing suit and not feel terrible about myself. I see how hard you work, and it makes me feel like I can do that too’."

clip image006 Can Celebrity and Money Fill The Love Bucket?

source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/celebritynews/

Lyrics to Parachutes :

In a haze, a stormy haze
I’ll be round, I’ll be loving you, always
Always

Here I am and I’ll take my time
Here I am and I’ll wait in line, always
Always

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

There we stand about to fly
Peeking down over land
Parachute behind
What was that moment for which we live?
Without a parachute about to dive
I find myself convincing
Blindly falling faster
How easy
Know the place I’m leaving
And the rest just is gone
Oh the adoration
But how much strength does it take
For exploration
For split decision
Or are you stronger to remain
I find myself convincing
Blindly falling faster
How easy
Know the place I’m leaving
And the rest is just gone
It crept up on me
Ignored all my pleas
Begging to leave
No justice to name me
Fell out of the sky
Cease it to be
Without a reply
Gravity fails me
And when I awoke
I knew what was real
Hope to convince you
Lies they all torture me
Opened the door
Knew what was me
I finally realized
Parachute over me

There we stand about to fly
Peeking down over land
Parachute behind
What was that moment for which we live?
Without a parachute about to dive
I find myself convincing
Blindly falling faster
How easy
Know the place I’m leaving
And the rest just is gone
Oh the adoration
But how much strength does it take
For exploration
For split decision
Or are you stronger to remain
I find myself convincing
Blindly falling faster
How easy
Know the place I’m leaving
And the rest is just gone
It crept up on me
Ignored all my pleas
Begging to leave
No justice to name me
Fell out of the sky
Cease it to be
Without a reply
Gravity fails me
And when I awoke
I knew what was real
Hope to convince you
Lies they all torture me
Opened the door
Knew what was me
I finally realized
Parachute over me

~~~~~~~~~~~~

More about marriages in the US Census – PA marriages work better (perhaps more love buckets are full?)

The report, from the U.S. Census, finds distinct regional differences, with states in the Northeast having the lowest marriage rates and lowest divorce rates for both men and women, and states in the South having the highest. New Jersey is among those with the lowest for both sexes; states with high rates for both men and women include Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas. "This does not mean you should move to the Northeast if you want your marriage to last," says sociologist Andrew Cherlin of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, who has reviewed the data. [1]

N.J. was the only state with lower rates for both men and women in a Census Bureau report. Pennsylvanians are both marrying and divorcing at a lower rate than people in most of the rest of the country, a new U.S. Census Bureau report says. It’s a quality they share with many men and women in the Northeastern United States. New Jersey was the only state with a lower rate for marriage and divorce for both men and women. [2]

In the South, there are higher rates of marriage and higher rates of divorce for men and women, said Diana Elliott, a family demographer with the U.S. Census Bureau and co-author of the new report. [3]

Diana Elliott, a family demographer for the U.S. Census Bureau, said it is important to understand marital trends and regional differences. Demographers would know how the recession affected marriage and divorce rates if data had been collected earlier in the decade, she said. The new data also will help gauge the impact of federal policies such as the Healthy Marriage Initiative. [4]

Diana Elliott, a Census Bureau family demographer, said the relatively high proportion of people who pursue college degrees in the Northeast was presumably a primary reason for lower marriage and divorce rates. "Part of what’s going on is that people don’t get married until their education is complete" and they have a foothold in their careers, said Elliott, who worked on the report, "Marital Events of Americans: 2009." "In the Northeast, first marriages tend to be delayed and the marriage rates are lower, meaning there are also fewer divorces," she said. [2] Sometimes the data surprises people because regions we think of as socially conservative have higher rates of divorce, but that’s largely because people have less education and marry younger." The analysis is the first such comprehensive look at state and national data since a 1991 report based on 1988 data from the National Center for Health Statistics, which then stopped collecting such data. After a 20-year gap, Census began collecting the data reflected in this report, based on 3 million households in the 2009 American Community Survey. "It’s been such long time since we’ve been able to paint regional and a state-by-state picture; it really shows different marriage philosophies and how we have different marriage cultures in the same nation," says Census family demographer Diana Elliott. Because data were collected during the height of the recession, it’s possible they might even understate rates, Cherlin says. [1]

"Surprisingly, the South and West, which we think of as more socially conservative, have higher rates of divorce than does the supposedly liberal East," said Andrew Cherlin, a professor of sociology and public policy at Johns Hopkins University. "The reason is that young adults in the South and West tend to have less education and marry earlier, both of which lead to a higher risk of divorce." "The South and West also have many migrants from other parts of the region who have left their social support networks behind. When they have marital problems, they have fewer people to turn to for help," he added. As a whole, marriages are now at a record low, with just 52 percent of adults 18 and over saying they were joined in wedlock, compared with 57 percent in 2000, according to census data released last September. The never-married included 46.3 percent of young adults 25-34 — the first time the share of never-married young adults exceeded those who were married, 44.9 percent, with the rest being divorced or widowed. [5]

Pamela Smock, a sociology professor at the University of Michigan, said the rising median age of first marriage is a reflection in part of the proliferation of new types of family groups, including couples who choose to live together and/or have children outside of marriage. "People are no longer following some lockstep script about when it is time to get married," she said. As a whole, marriages are now at a record low, with just 52 percent of adults 18 and over saying they were joined in wedlock, compared with 57 percent in 2000, according to census data released last September. The never-married included 46.3 percent of young adults 25-34 — the first time the share of never-married young adults exceeded those who were married, 44.9 percent, with the rest being divorced or widowed. [6]

People in Kentucky had a higher marriage rate in 2009, but were also getting divorced at a higher rate compared to national rates, according to new data released Thursday by the Census Bureau. [7] Virginia has the highest marriage rate in the D.C. region, but also the highest divorce rate. The Washington area’s men are marrying more often than women and they’re doing it most often in Virginia, a report released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau shows. [8] Southern men and women had higher rates of divorce in 2009 than their counterparts in other parts of the country: 10.2 per 1,000 for men and 11.1 per 1,000 for women, according to a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau released Thursday. [3] WASHINGTON, Aug. 25, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Men and women in the South had higher rates of divorce in 2009 than in other regions of the country, 10.2 per 1,000 for men and 11.1 per 1,000 for women, according to a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau. [9]

We’re an island of stability in the morally-depraved Northeast, according to new figures from the U.S. Census Bureau. There is a marriage rate of 19.1 per 1,000 men or women for the nation. [10] PITTSBURGH (AP) — Pennsylvanians are both marrying and divorcing at a lower rate than the rest of the country, a quality they share with many men and women of the Northeast, a new U.S. Census Bureau report says. Sociologists have found that factors such as age, income, religion and education. [11]

By contrast, men and women in the Northeast had the lowest rates of divorce, 7.2 and 7.5 ( see table ). These new statistics come from the report Marital Events of Americans: 2009, which examines marriage, divorce and widowhood in America as well as selected characteristics for those experiencing a marital event in the past year. The report is the first of its kind to describe the detailed characteristics of marital events among Americans ages 15 and older using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). [9] The census report tracked marriage and divorce from all 50 states for a year to draw conclusions about the institution of marriage. Overall, both marriage and divorce were more common in the southern United States and less common in northeastern states, according to the bureau’s Marital Events of Americans report. [12]

North Dakota ranked among the top states in marriages while posting lower than average divorce rates. The Census Bureau report attributed the lower rates of divorce in the Northeast in part to delayed marriage in those places, which decreased the likelihood of marital discord down the road. [6] The marriage market for men was bullish in Arkansas and several Western states in 2009, while divorce rates on the two coasts were lower than they were in the Old South, the U.S. Census Bureau reported Thursday in a first-of-its-kind survey of American mating and splitting patterns in the states. [13] The U.S. Census Bureau’s latest divorce stats prove the South, starting with Alabama and Arkansas, have the highest divorce rates in the nation. [14]

A family demographer from the Census Bureau, Diana Elliot, said divorce rates in the South are higher because marriage rates are higher in the South. [14] The federal government and other sources have published occasional reports on marriage and divorce — another from the Census Bureau just three months ago detailed how marriages are generally lasting longer and the divorce rate is continuing a steady decline. [11]

PORTLAND, Maine — A new Census Bureau analysis finds that Maine has the second highest divorce rate it the country. [15]

By comparison, four of the 10 states with below-average divorce rates for women, ranging from 6.0 to 8.9, were in the Northeast: Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. A divorced mother of two who grew up in Virginia and is now living in the Atlanta area, Lynn (not her real name) said she knows why her eight-year marriage failed. She and her ex-husband got married after a whirlwind three-month courtship, and she now knows, "You really don’t know somebody after three months." She didn’t have a college degree when she got married, although she did eventually graduate from college and is now a teacher. Lynn said she can see some reasons that Southerners divorce at higher rates than the nation as a whole. "Where I grew up in Virginia, I saw some of my peers not finishing high school, some not going to college and some not finishing college," she said. "I saw a lot of people just staying in my hometown, staying in dead-end jobs, just settling, taking very little risk-taking for their careers." [16] Later marriages have traditionally been viewed as more likely to last longer. That’s a link making itself known more favorably in states like Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York than places such as Arkansas, Georgia and West Virginia, where divorce rates are well above the norm, according to the data released today from the 2009 American Community Survey. Sociologists have found that factors such as age, income, religion and education can all play key roles in timing and success of marriage. [11]

Nationally, the divorce rate was 9.2 among men and 9.7 among women. Pennsylvania’s rates of both marriage and divorce were among the five lowest for men and women among the 50 states. New Jersey was the only state with a lower rate for both genders and for marriage and divorce. [11] Five of the nine states that had divorce rates for men significantly below the U.S. average — ranging from 6.1 to 8.5 — were the Northeastern states of Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. The same was true for Southern women. [16] Four states with below-average divorce rates for women were in the Northeast: Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. [9]

Thirteen states had median durations for second marriages for women below the U.S. median of 14.5 years. This included six states in the Northeast (Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island and Vermont) ranging from 13.1 to 13.6 years. Among those widowed in the last year, 77 percent of men and 73 percent of women were white alone, non-Hispanic. [14]

Marriages among 25 – 29 year olds have a divorce rate between 16 percent for women and 22 percent for men. 27 percent of women who marry at ages 20 and younger experience divorce. [14] Divorce rates quell in marriages of older people. 8.5 percent of women between the ages of 30 – 34 are divorced. 5.1 percent between 35 – 39 are divorced. 11 percent of 30 – 34 year old males are divorced while 6.5 percent of males 35 – 39 are divorced. [14]

When comparing marriage and divorce rates per 1,000 people in the region, men in Virginia get married more frequently than Virginia women. Those marriage rates also beat what’s going on in D.C. and Maryland. [17] Men and women in the District also combine for the region’s lowest divorce rate, and its marriage rate is comparable with Maryland’s. That’s likely because the District tends to attract a young population. More than half have never been married — a roughly 20-point difference from neighboring jurisdictions — and those who are married are doing it for the first time. [8]

The marriage rate (per 1,000) nationwide was 19.1 among men and 17.6 among women, the report said. 7.7 of every 1,000 men and 7.4 women were within their first year of divorce. [11] A higher marriage rate typically goes hand in hand with a higher education, according to the report. This has especially been true among women, it said. The story for divorces is reversed — Virginia men and women had a higher divorce rate in 2009 than their counterparts in Maryland and the District. That’s partly because of the higher marriage rate, Haskins said. [8]

Marriage rates for Iowa women were 21.5 per 1,000 in Iowa, 17.1 in the Midwest and 17.6 in the U.S. Divorce rates were 10.8 in Iowa, 9.2 in the Midwest and 9.7 in the United States. "We’d love to have a divorce rate of zero," said Bob Vander Plaats, president and CEO of the Family Leader, a social conservative group best known for its efforts to mobilize Iowans against same-sex marriage and pushing Republican hopefuls for the presidential nomination to sign a 14-point marriage pledge. [12] I had a much better idea of who I was (when I married) at 29 versus who I was at 19." It’s ironic that pressure on people to get married early also puts them at higher risk of divorce, said Stephanie Coontz, history and family studies professor at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington, director of research and public education for the Council on Contemporary Families, and author of "Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage" and other books. "The very fact that people feel less pressure to get married (in the Northeast) means they can be more selective about who they marry and take their time, " Coontz said. "They don’t have to rush into it to please parents or avoid stigma of premarital sex." Whatever the reasons for the South’s higher divorce rate, Christian author Jonathan Merritt said that church leaders are focusing more on divorce recovery when they should be focusing on preventing divorce. [16]

"Divorce rates tend to be higher in the South because marriage rates are also higher in the South," Ms. Elliott explained. She said, people in the Northeast tend to marry at older ages, which leads to lower marriage rates and lower divorce rates. [13] People in the Northeast wait longer to marry and, after a divorce, are less likely to remarry. Those in the South, which includes Texas, marry at a younger age and remarry more quickly. Elliott said that explains why second marriages across the South are of longer duration than those in some other parts of the country. [4]

"Sometimes people get married just not thinking at all." People in the Northeast and on the West Coast are more likely to live together than those in the South and Midwest. "So when they break up, it’s a non-statistic," said Regnerus, the UT sociologist. "They don’t have a divorce to show for it." Some studies suggest people are delaying marriage until they are more financially secure – one explanation for the fact that college graduates are more likely to marry than those with less education – but Crain has noticed something else. "I see a lot of people in their 20s and early 30s who are very idealistic," he said. "They have this feeling that if they start dating someone, there’s someone better out there. [4]

Surprisingly, the South and West, which we think of as more socially conservative, have higher rates of divorce than does the supposedly liberal East. The reason is that young adults in the South and West tend to have less education and marry earlier, both of which lead to a higher risk of divorce. He also notes that "the South and West also have many migrants from other parts of the region who have left their social support networks behind. When they have marital problems, they have fewer people to turn to for help." It’s worth noting that despite recent advice that women should marry young for ultimate happiness, this research shows that people who marry later have stronger unions. [18] "Surprisingly, the South and West, which we think of as more socially conservative, have higher rates of divorce than does the supposedly liberal East," said Andrew Cherlin, a professor of sociology and public policy at Johns Hopkins University. "The reason is that young adults in the South and West tend to have less education and marry earlier, both of which lead to a higher risk of divorce." "The South and West also have many migrants from other parts of the region who have left their social support networks behind. When they have marital problems, they have fewer people to turn to for help," he added. [6]

In the South, people tend to marry earlier and often have less education, both of which increase divorce risk, he says. Those in the Northeast tend to have more education and marry later. [1]
In general, less educated women marry at younger ages than college-educated women, and less educated couples have higher divorce rates." Values about premarital sex associated with the Bible Belt and rural America may be encouraging people to marry early, at ages when they are likely to have less education and less income to support a long-lasting marriage, according to Naomi Cahn, law professor at The George Washington University Law School and co-author of "Red Families v. Blue Families: Legal Polarization and the Creation of Culture." [16]

Marriages between partners age 20-24 have divorce rates as high as 38 percent for men and 36 for women. [14] "We see that since 1970, the median age for men and women has increased for first marriage by about 6 years." That means the average man marries at about age 28, while for the average woman it’s at about age 26. Elliot says these rates are connected to higher education levels. She says, the more highly educated a population is, the more it tends to delay marriage. [19] Comparing the new national data to previous reports, the median age for first marriages by men has risen from 22.5 in 1970 to 25.5 in 1988 and 28.4 in 2009. Women have always married younger than men, and their median age at marriage climbed from 20.6 in 1970 to 23.7 in 1988 and 26.5 in 2009. [2]

As to the age at first marriage, the Census Bureau found that men and women were now joining in wedlock later and across a greater range of ages. For instance, in 1970, more than half of men, 57 percent, were between the ages of 20 and 24 when they first married. [6] A first-of-its-kind analysis by the Census Bureau released Thursday found that U.S. marriages are at an all-time low, and that people are waiting longer before marrying for the first time. The percentage of women who wed as teenagers has dropped precipitously since 1970, while many men are postponing marriage past their college-age years. [5] The Census Bureau released a report on marriage today that finds – surprise! – both men and women are waiting longer before marrying for the first time. [20]

For women, much of middle America and Texas were high-marriage zones, while East Coast and Great Lakes states were lower-than-average areas for divorce. It’s been years since America had such a detailed "snapshot" about these vital statistics, said Diana B. Elliott, a family demographer at the Census Bureau and co-author of "Marital Events of Americans: 2009," released Thursday. [13] What really affects divorce rates? 24/7 Wall St. analyzed a report just released by the Census Bureau that tracks marital events of Americans in 2009. [21]
The report assesses data collected in 2009 on marital events — marriage, divorce or widowhood — that occurred within the prior year for respondents who are at least 15 years old. [8] Beginning in 2008, questions about marital events were added to the ACS to collect national and state-level marriage and divorce data. These new marital events items fill a void in the marriage and divorce data collected in the United States. [9]

DES MOINES — Iowans had a higher rate of both divorce and marriage than their peers in the Midwest and in the United States as a whole, data released today by the U.S. Census shows. [12] Census data released Thursday shows Nevada’s marriage and divorce rates exceeded the national average in 2009. [22] The commonwealth also has the highest divorce rate. The Examiner crunched the census data and also found Virginia beats national averages for both marriage and divorce. [17] In the Washington region, the rates of marriages and divorces are close to the national average, with some variations. Virginia has the highest rates in the region for both marriages and divorces. About 21 out of 1,000 Virginia men marry each year, compared to 19 nationally, and 18 in both the District and Maryland. [5]

The bureau didn’t actually start collecting data on marriages and divorces until 2008. Its analysis of the first sets of numbers shows that in Wisconsin, neither the marriage nor the divorce rates are as high as the national average. [19] For instance, for the first time, the bureau offers strong evidence of regional differences in marriage and divorce rates. [13]

As far as I could tell, the report offers little new to the conversation about trends in marriage and the changing face of the American family. It notes that marriage is still at a historical low, but that states in the South and West rank among the highest for marriage. Many of these same states also have higher divorce rates. [20] WASHINGTON (AP) — Singles, take note: With marriages at an all-time low, states in the South and West rank among the highest for couples hearing wedding bells. Many of these states also have higher rates of divorce. [6]

Nine of the 14 states with divorce rates for women above the U.S. average, ranging from 10.7 to 16.2, were in the South. They included Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas and West Virginia. [16] Fourteen states had divorce rates for women above the U.S. average, ranging from 10.7 to 16.2 ( see figure ). [9]

In 2009, 14 states had divorce rates for men that were significantly above the U.S. average, ranging from 10.0 to 13.5 per 1,000 ( see figure ). [9] The divorce rates count the number of divorces reported per 1,000 men and 1,000 women 15 years and older for the 12 months leading up to 2009. [21] Rates count the marital events reported in 2009 over the past 12 months per 1,000 men or women in the population 15 years old and older. [7]

There were 10.2 divorces per 1,000 men in the South in 2009 and 11.1 per 1,000 women. This was more than that year’s national average, which was 9.2 for men and 9.7 for women. [23] By comparison, men and women in the Northeast had the lowest rates of divorce, 7.2 and 7.5 per 1,000, which is also lower than the national divorce rate of 9.2 for men and 9.7 for women. [3] The national divorce rate was 9.2 for every 1,000 men and 9.7 for women. In the south, the divorce rate was at least a point higher for both sexes. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. [24]
In the northeast, men and women had average rates of divorce at 7.2 and

7.5 per every 1,000. [14] The Northeast rate is 7.2 per 1,000 for men and 7.5 per 1,000 for women, the study. The reason for this may be as simple as the fact that more people get married in the South, a census official said. [23] Virginia women married at a rate of 18.8 per 1,000. Both rates are slightly above the national average, while D.C. and Maryland fall below the average. [8] In Virginia, men got married in 2009 at a rate of 20.5 per 1,000, according to the report. [8]

Overall, the report shows that people living in northeastern states have lower marriage and divorce rates. While those in the southern states are more likely to get married, they also have higher divorce rates. [21] Youth and lack of education can lead to higher divorce rates, said D’Vera Cohn, a senior writer with the Pew Research Center, who wrote a report on " The States of Marriage and Divorce." [16]

"Marriage and divorce rates fell during the Depression, too." Another contributing factor is that 2009 was the first year that same-sex marriage was allowed in Iowa, resulting in an initial influx of marriage ceremonies, including many from out of state. [12] "Demographers like to have at least three years of data to look at," Stewart said. She said, a single year might not show a pattern of contributing factors. She said marriage and divorce rates are down overall nationwide, and it’s not likely only because more people are cohabitating. "Marriage and divorce are expensive," she said. [12] Virginia has the region’s highest marriage rate — but also the highest divorce rate — while the District’s urban environment attracts the greatest percentage of singles, the data show. [8] Here’s a look at data of marriage and divorce rates for Kentucky compared to the national rate. [7]

The census analysis is based on 2009 data from the American Community Survey, which sampled 3 million households. It is the first to describe detailed information on marriages and divorces from this survey after the National Center for Health Statistics stopped collecting such data in 1996. Post writer Carol Morello contributed to this report. [5] The ACS study covered nearly 40 times as many households, thorough enough to offer the first chance in many years to examine state differences reliably. Elliott said efforts were once made to compile national reports through the states’ own marriage and divorce records, but she said that’s no longer reliable as some states found it costly and time-consuming to participate. [11]

"Marrying at a younger age is more common in more traditional areas of the country," said Stewart, who includes the Midwest and South in that category. "Marrying young is one of the indicators of divorce; it’s not the only one, but there is a relationship." Stewart said the marriage and divorce data should be expanded beyond a single year — the figures the bureau released in its report were for 2009 only — to draw reliable conclusions. She said the pattern fits into the overall patterns that have been established by other sources. [12] People are more likely to marry, and to divorce, in Texas and across the South than in other parts of the country, according to new census data released today. [4] People in Wisconsin are getting married and divorced less often than couples in the rest of the country. That’s according to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau. [19] Either way marriage rates have been declining in recent years and according to a new Census Bureau Analysis, marriage rates are at an all time low. [25] Recently divorced women are about twice as likely to live in poverty as recently divorced men. Children of couples that divorced in the previous year are three times as likely to live with their mother as their father. Men have higher marriage rates across the board than women, which is explained by the greater likelihood that they will remarry. [2] Gender differences appear because women tend to live longer than men and marry older men, resulting in higher rates of widowhood. Men tend to remarry more than women, so their marriage rates are slightly higher, the report noted. [13] The District also has a lower occurrence of new widows, although the gap is greater with men than women. Women tend to live longer and marry older men, contributing to their higher rate of widowhood, according to the report. [8]

"There tend to be higher divorce rates in states where women marry young," Cohn said. [16] Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania also reported lower than average divorce rates for women ranging from 6.0 – 8.9. [14] Connecticut, Massachussetts, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania had divorce rates for men between 6.1 and 8.5. [14] States ranking lowest in divorce rates are New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts and New York. [25]
Higher than average divorce rates for men occurred mostly in Southern states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas. [9] In order to reflect economic conditions that appear to impact divorce rates, we reviewed median income and poverty levels for each state. These are the ten states with the highest divorce rates. [21] The states with particularly high divorce rates have below median household income as well as a high proportion of the population living below the poverty line. In the other states where divorce rates are high and poverty is not a predominant factor, such as Nevada, the reason may have to do with liberal divorce laws. [21]

"For example, if people for some reason in Wisconsin are delaying marriage, then the marriage rates are going to be a little bit lower, and then the divorce rates are going to be a little bit lower." [19] In the Northeast, you have people who are delaying first marriages, and consequently there are lower rates of marriage and lower rates of divorce. [3] In the Northeast first marriages tend to be delayed and marriages rates are also lower, which translates to fewer divorces. [14] "In contrast, in the Northeast, first marriages tend to be delayed and the marriage rates are lower, meaning there are also fewer divorces." [23]
Maine, Alaska, Oklahoma, Kentucky and Nevada, ranked at the top for divorces, while Utah, Wyoming and Arkansas — which had the highest marriage rates — were also higher than average in marital breakups. [5] According to the Huffington Post, the South and West were the country’s most divorce-prone regions, with Alaska, Oklahoma, Kentucky and Nevada reporting the highest divorce rates. [18] By region, the South and West had the most marriages, with rates of roughly 19 per 1,000. They also led in divorces, each at about 10 per 1,000. [6] According to the data, the marriage rate for Iowa males over 15 years of age in 2009 was 21.5 per 1,000. [12]
As a whole, since 1970, the median age at first marriage increased from 22.5 years to 28.4 for men and from 20.6 years to 26.5 for women. [6] The median age of first marriage has risen sharply nationwide, up to 28.4 for men and 26.5 for women in 2009, compared with 22.5 and 20.6 respectively in 1970. [4]
For men, the median age of marriage has risen from 22.5 years in 1970 to 28.4 in 2009; for women, it has risen from 20.6 years to 26.5. [13]
"There are biological reasons why the marriage age is not going to rise by more than few more years — namely men and women need to have time to have children." [1]

"I think it will peak no higher than around 30 for women," says psychologist Howard Markman, co-director of the Center for Marital and Family Studies, University of Denver. "Most of us in the field think it has to do with dramatic increase over time in cohabitation — not as an alternative to marriage, but for most people it is a developmental stage toward marriage," he says. Markman says young people now focus on their careers and economic stability more than in the past and he expects that to continue as more women than men seek higher education. "It will level off at the point where women are starting to feel like they want to be married and start having a family." [1] There were 3.5 instances of widowhood for men and 7.8 for women, per every 1,000 people. Children living with a parent who divorced in 2009 were more likely to live in a household headed by their mother (75 percent) than in a household headed by their father (25 percent). Children living with a parent who divorced in 2009 were more likely to be in a household below the poverty level (28 percent) compared with other children (19 percent), and they were more likely to live in a rented home (53 percent) compared with other children (36 percent). The economic well-being of those who experienced a recent marital event differed. [14] 27 percent of women who divorced in the past 12 months had less than $25,000 in annual household income compared with 17 percent of recently divorced men. [14] Women divorcing in the past year were more likely than men to be in poverty (22% versus 11%). Women divorcing in the past year had less household income than their male counterparts. Of those women, 27% had annual household incomes below $25,000, compared with 17% of divorced men. [16]

There were 22.4 marriages for every 1,000 women in Nevada that year, compared to the national rate of 17.6. [22] National rates of marriage in the past 12 months were 19.1 for men and 17.6 for women. [14]

Faith communities must provide support systems to salvage damaged marriages and resurrect dead marriages." Divorce still pushes more women into poverty than men and affects their children, since children are still more likely to live with their mothers (75%) than their fathers (25%), according to the same U.S. Census report. [16] A new U.S. Census report found that in 2009, the southern part of the country had the highest rate of divorce. [24]

Couples without children, tend to divorce at 66 percent while couples with children divorce at 40 percent. Overall, divorce rates in the U.S. are inflated because young people divorce twice as fast as people in their twenties divorce twice as fast people in the thirties. [14] Locally, more singles live in the District, but that’s not the only reason the D.C. divorce rate is lowest in the region. It also has fewer people in the age group that’s most likely to get divorced: those between 34 and 44 years old. [17] Education among people with high school diplomas or less is also a major contributing factor to high divorce rates in the American South. [14] Nationally, people under 30 on average have the highest rates of divorce, which lends to the nation’s inflated divorce rates. [14] Wisconsin divorce rates were lower than the national average by similar margins. [19]

About nine Virginia men out of 1,000 divorce every year, similar to the national rate and among Maryland men. [5] In the District, just 6 ouf of 1,000 men divorce every year, one of the lowest rates in the country. [5] In 2009, men and women in the South had higher rates of divorce in 2009 than in other parts of the country. [14]
In all, there were 19.1 weddings performed per 1,000 men and 17.6 per 1,000 women across the U.S. in 2009, while divorces became final for 9.2 of every 1,000 men and 9.7 of every 1,000 women. [6] Overall, in 2009, for every 1,000 men, there were 19.1 marriages, 9.2 divorces and 3.5 instances of widowhood. [13] In all, there were 23.2 new marriages for every 1,000 men in Nevada in 2009, compared to the national average of 19.1. [22]

"There is enormous tension between moral values and actual practices." Lawrenceville, New Jersey, resident Jennifer DeBord, a married mother of two girls, made many decisions that could keep her 13-year marriage strong. She finished college, explored different careers, dated a few different men and lived with one boyfriend before figuring out what she wanted in a mate. DeBord and her husband, Jason, who works as a Broadway conductor and musician, both moved to New York City to pursue their careers in the arts. [16] The person has to be absolutely perfect." That’s not the only change in attitude he has witnessed over the years. He married in 1982, at age 24. Three years later, he divorced. At the time, he was a seminary student training to become a marriage and family counselor. "All the counsel I got from churches was, ‘You better look for a new career,’ " he said. He did, working in real estate. 14 years ago, at age 39, he remarried. He and his wife, Holly, now have four children, including two from her first marriage. He is back at his original career, as a member of the counseling staff at Houston’s First Baptist Church. [4] Nationally, though, the most striking finding is a continued clear pattern toward later ages at first marriage, which have been inching up for 30 years. "We’re at the point now that it’s higher than before the turn of the century," says Census family demographer Diana Elliott. [1]

Pamela Smock, a sociology professor at the University of Michigan, said the rising median age of first marriage is a reflection in part of the proliferation of new types of family groups, including couples who choose to live together and/or have children outside of marriage. [5] Cherlin agrees that the median age could rise by a few more years before it peaks; in Spain and Italy, for example, the ages at first marriage are around 30. "It’s not going to go up forever," Cherlin agrees. [1]

By 2009, the age distribution was much wider, with 24 percent marrying between the ages of 20 and 24, 34 percent marrying between the ages of 25 and 29, 20 percent marrying between the ages of 30 and 34, and 9 percent marrying between the ages of 35 and 39. Similarly for women, in 1970, 42 percent of women were teens when they married, and by the age of 24 about 88 percent of women had a first marriage. [6] In 1970, 88 percent of women had gotten married by age 24, compared to 38 percent in 2009. Worgul said it has been shown previously that when both members of a couple are younger than 22 when they marry, they wind up in divorce nine out of 10 times. "It’s not that they don’t have good intentions," he said, "but they may not be making a good choice, and they don’t have the tools yet to understand how to resolve conflicts." [11] The report noted only 7 percent of the women getting married for the first time in 2009 were teenagers, whereas 42 percent of the females doing so in 1970 were teens. [11] The report said only 7 percent of the women marrying for the first time in 2009 were teenagers, compared with 42 percent in 1970. [2]

The report also finds that people are waiting longer before marrying. The percentage of women who wed as teenagers has dropped precipitously since 1970, while many men are postponing marriage past their college-age years. [15] Marriages have been declining for years due to rising divorce, more unmarried couples living together and increased job prospects for women. Analysts say younger people also may now be increasingly choosing to delay marriage as they struggle to find work and resist making long-term commitments in the recent recession. [6] For every 1,000 women, there were 17.6 marriages, 9.7 divorces and 7.8 instances of widowhood that year. [13]
Where you live may influence your attitudes and actions toward marriage and divorce more than you think, suggests a federal report out today that gives the clearest picture in 20 years about the evolution of marriage and divorce across the USA. [1]
Historically, data on marriages and divorces in the United States were collected from marriage and divorce certificates filed and collected at the state-level through the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) vital statistics system. [9] The survey counted relationships for people aged 15 and older. It does not reflect Nevada’s reputation as a wedding and divorce destination because the data represents where people were living at the time of the survey, not where the marriage or divorce took place. [22] It seems meaningful to me that this is the number of marriages per year, not a statistical measure of how many people are married at any given time. [10]
At the same time that marriages have been postponed, the nation has seen a surge in cohabitation among unmarried couples. The new census report does not address those relationships and their outcomes. [11] The census data does not differentiate between same-sex and opposite-sex marriage in the report released today. [12] In the report released Thursday, the Census Bureau based its findings on data collected by American Community Survey in 2009. [23] Diana Elliot is a family demographer for the U.S. Census Bureau. She says those numbers go hand in hand. [19]

There’s no question that in past 50 years the divorce rate in the U.S. has increased. [21] Our analysis suggests that the difficult economic conditions of many southern states drives the divorce rate higher because residents tend to be poorer. [21] "There’s a moral crisis in red states that’s produced by higher divorce rates and the disparity between parental values and behavior of young adults," said Cahn. [16] States ranked at the top in divorce rates are Maine, Alaska, Oklahoma, Kentucky and Nevada. [25]
Divorce rates in the same categories were 10.2 per 1,000 in Iowa, 8.0 in Illinois and 9.1 per 1,000 in the Midwest. [12]
The three states also had higher rates of divorce but did not rank among the highest in that category. [25] Some of the most conservative states in the country actually have the highest rates of marital breakdown. [18]

Among women, about 19 out of 1,000 in Virginia marry every year, higher than the national rate of about 18. [5] The rate nationwide was 19.1 among men and 17.6 among women, the report said. [2] For all jurisdictions, the rate for men is significantly higher than for women. [8]
Women who divorced in the past 12 months were more likely to receive public assistance than recently divorced men (23 percent and 15 percent). [14] Women who divorced in the past 12 months reported less household income than recently divorced men. [14]
Men and women who married in the last 12 months "generally had higher levels of education than the overall population." [13] For every 1,000 Pennsylvanians in 2009, 15.5 men and 14.3 women reported getting married in the previous 12 months. [2]
Of Virginia men and women who have been married, nearly one of every five has been married twice. [8] Virginia has the highest number of men in the region who have married three or more times. [17]
In the battle of the sexes, men in D.C., Maryland and Virginia are tying the knot more frequently than women. [17] Women who divorced in the past year were more likely to receive public assistance than men (23% versus 15%). [16] There was a similar gap for Wisconsin women, with about 1.6 percent in the state saying "I do" that year, while nationally it was closer to 1.8 percent. [19]
Maine has 13 divorces for every 1,000 men in the state. That’s second only to Arkansas, which had 13.5 divorces. [15] The statistics are part of the Marital Events of Americans 2009 study, which examines marriage, divorce and widowhood in America. [24] The Canadian government said last month it will stop collecting marriage and divorce statistics, reflecting budget cuts and the changing nature of relationships, as more people live together rather than marry. [4] The state’s residents marry later, a choice viewed as more likely to make marriages last longer. Sociologists have found that factors such as age, income, religion, and education can play key roles in the timing and success of marriage. [2] "What is interesting, I think, is that it continues to be delayed," Elliott says. "I read articles in the 1980s when they were noticing this change in the age of first marriage and they didn’t know where it was going to end and we still don’t know. [1] Nationally the most striking finding is a continued clear pattern toward later ages at first marriage. [1]
George Worgul Jr., chairman of the Duquesne University theology department, who teaches a course on marriage, said the relatively higher age of Pennsylvania’s population could be a factor, but entrenched cultural support may be a greater factor in marital stability. "You tend to see the presence of more extended families, more of the permanent social networking and support, and those things that have a tendency to sustain marriage," he said. [2]
The latest statistics come from the 2009 American Community Survey, an attempt to offer more detail about marriage, divorce and widowhood and fill the void left when the National Center for Health Statistics stopped collecting similar information in 1996. [4] In 1996, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the NCHS discontinued the collection of detailed state-level vital records data from marriage and divorce certificates. [9] Nationwide, divorces are most common among 34- to 44-year-olds, an underrepresented age group in the District, according to census data. [8] The report complements the detailed data being released from the 2010 Census, which offers a window onto modern family life. [4]
Cheryl Wetzstein covers family and social issues as a national reporter for The Washington Times. She has been a reporter for three decades, working in New York City and Washington, D.C. Since joining The Washington Times in 1985, she has been a features writer, environmental and consumer affairs reporter, and assistant business editor. [13] The Northeast (with the exception of Maine) reported the lowest rates — New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts and New York were especially divorce-proof. [18] New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts and New York ranked among the lowest in divorces. [6]
In Texas and across the South, the new statistics show that many people, like the Crains, will remarry after a divorce. [4] In every survey on the quality of life, health, dieting, exercise, education and now divorce, the American South fares poorly. [14]

When it comes to marriage in the United States the famous Bob Dylan lyrics "times they are a changin" quickly came to mind. [25] The Northeast’s below-average number of annual marriages may be a result of existing marriages lasting longer or fewer divorces. (Put in a more cheeky way, a lower number of marriages for each married person.) [10] People in Wisconsin are getting married and divorced less often than couples in the rest of the country. [19]

Alabama and Arkansas lead the nation in the least number of college graduates, highest rates of obesity, teen pregnancy and students with the lowest achievement scores from kindergarten through senior year. [14] In Wisconsin, only about 1.7 percent of men tied the knot in 2009, compared with 1.9 percent nationally. [19]

SOURCES
1. Marriage, divorce rates higher in the South, lower in Northeast – USATODAY.com
2. Pennsylvanians slow to marry – and divorce | Philadelphia Inquirer | 08/25/2011
3. Whats fueling Bible Belt divorces CNN Belief Blog – CNN.com Blogs
4. Marriage and divorce, Texas-style – Houston Chronicle
5. As U.S. marriage rate declines, mid-Atlantic is mostly average – Post Now – The Washington Post
6. Census: South, West lead U.S. in both marriages, divorces » Evansville Courier & Press
7. Census: Kentucky high in marriage, divorce rates – FOX19 News and Weather – Greater Cincinnati Area
8. Region’s men marrying more often than women | Liz Farmer | DC | Washington Examiner
9. Census Bureau News — Marital Events of Americans: 2009 — WASHINGTON, Aug. 25, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ –
10. Steady Habits? CT Marriage Rate Highest in Northeast – Rick Green | CT Confidential
11. Census report says Pa. marriages work better – Houston Chronicle
12. Iowans marry above national average, but divorce more as well
13. Census Bureau gets specific on nuptials – Washington Times
14. Census finds higher divorce rates in the Bible Belt American South
15. Census: Maine Has Second Highest Divorce Rate In US – Portland News Story – WMTW Portland
16. What’s fueling Bible Belt divorces – CNN.com
17. WTOP Mobile
18. Red States Are Rife With Divorce
19. Wisconsin marriage and divorce rates trail the nation’s | Superior Telegram | Superior, Wisconsin
20. Independent Women’s Forum – Another Report on Marriage Tells Us Much the Same
21. The States With The Highest Divorce Rates – 24/7 Wall St.
22. Mobile – Nevada’s divorce rate exceeds national average :: The Republic
23. Study: South has highest rate of divorce – CNN.com
24. New U.S. Census report finds national divorce rates highest in the south
25. U.S. Marriage Rates Declining, Wyoming Marriage Rates Remain Strong – KOWB 1290

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